Tag Archives: honesty

Telling the truth in Business

23 Jan

“Do you ever tell the truth Ari?”
“I tell the parts that matter.”

No article, no advice, no infographics.

Just a question or two.

In business, how important is Honesty?

Is it really needed?

Think. Brolic!

Integrity, It isn’t a Punchline

24 Dec

in·teg·ri·ty/inˈteɡrədē/
noun
the quality of being honest and having strong moral principles; moral uprightness.
the state of being whole and undivided.

Now a lot of people will tell you to be cutthroat, succeed by any means.

I call foul on the(that?) play!

Being a man of principles has done more for me in life than anything.
Lead by example in both your business and your personal life. Teammates and employees will follow you and this will lead to better work ethic, morale, customer service and an overall more successful corporate culture.

Honesty in business will be your calling card and if you are in sales- it will save you in times of lowered economics.

We tip higher for better service right?
So why not lead better and see just how far it takes you.
I guarantee the results will be quantifiable and tangible.

Live Brolic!

Integrity, It isn’t a Punchline

24 Dec

in·teg·ri·ty/inˈteɡrədē/
noun
the quality of being honest and having strong moral principles; moral uprightness.
the state of being whole and undivided.

Now a lot of people will tell you to be cutthroat, succeed by any means.

I call foul on the(that?) play!

Being a man of principles has done more for me in life than anything.
Lead by example in both your business and your personal life. Teammates and employees will follow you and this will lead to better work ethic, morale, customer service and an overall more successful corporate culture.

Honesty in business will be your calling card and if you are in sales- it will save you in times of lowered economics.

We tip higher for better service right?
So why not lead better and see just how far it takes you.
I guarantee the results will be quantifiable and tangible.

Live Brolic!

Link

Facebook’s payment network is its largest source of revenue after advertising. Primarily through selling credits for virtual goods for use in social games like Farmville, Facebook earned $557 million last year through its payments network. What’s most surprising to a cynic like me is how honestly Facebook accounts for revenues from the payment network. There’s no accounting trickery going on in that $557 million figure. Payment networks provide easy opportunities for abuse, especially when they are configured like Facebook’s. On Facebook, users purchase credits that can later be redeemed for virtual goods, like a cow in Farmville. This creates the opportunity to book revenues from the initial purchase—even though much of the initial purchase price will later have to be handed over to the merchant of the virtual goods. Groupon was doing something like this. If it sold a $50 coupon for $100 of services, it booked the entire $50 as revenue—even though it would have to remit much of that to the merchant actually providing the goods and services. I’m not an expert in accounting rules but that strikes me as at least a bit questionable. Groupon was able to count the entire purchase price of the coupon as revenue because it considered itself the “primary obligor” in the coupon purchases. This struck me—and many others—as a bit of a stretch. Weren’t the companies that provided the services the primary obligors?

16 May

Facebook’s the good guy in this accounting practice?

%d bloggers like this: